Behavior Change for a Sustainable World Award

Congratulations to our own Javid Rahaman for winning The NJABA “Behavior Change for a Sustainable World” Research Award!

Javid Rahaman, who is a BI for New Behavioral Network and is currently a student in the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. Program at Rowan College won the NJABA “Behavior Change for a Sustainable World” Research Award for his proposal promoting Eco-Driving using Immediate Feedback such as alerts when you are speeding and other behaviors that can be immediately recognized and changed to promote safer and more ecological driving.

This prestigious award is donated by Dr. William Heward. The Purpose of the challenge is to support research using behavior analysis concepts and principles to promote sustainable practices/environmentally friendly behavior change. Any applied, basic, or translational study to be conducted with a primary goal of increasing understanding of human behavior and environmental preservation/enhancement is eligible for consideration.

Javid said that he was very excited to be recognized and that he actually just found out that he won. The article ran in the Rowan University newsletter last week.

Source: Rowan University Newsletter

September is National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month

In honor of ovarian cancer awareness month, the Ben Franklin Bridge, which connects Philadelphia to Southern New Jersey, will be lit teal!

TEAL is an acronym for Take Early Action & Live.
It is very important to pay attention when you experience any irregularities relating to your pelvic and back areas. Ovarian cancer is difficult to detect, especially, in the early stages. This is partly due to the fact that these two small, almond shaped organs are deep within the abdominal cavity, one on each side of the uterus. Because the signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer have been described as vague or silent, only around 19% of ovarian cancer is found in the early stages. 

Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer

These are some of the potential signs and symptoms of ovarian cancer:

  • Bloating
  • Pelvic or abdominal pain
  • Trouble eating or feeling full quickly
  • Feeling the need to urinate urgently or often

Other symptoms of ovarian cancer can include:

  • Fatigue
  • Upset stomach or heartburn
  • Back pain
  • Pain during sex
  • Constipation or menstrual changes

If symptoms persist for more than two weeks, see your physician.

Persistence of Symptoms

When the symptoms are persistent, when they do not resolve with normal interventions (like diet change, exercise, laxatives, rest) it is imperative for a woman to see her doctor. Persistence of symptoms is key. Symptoms typically occur in advanced stages when tumor growth creates pressure on the bladder and rectum, and fluid begins to form.
A recto-vaginal pelvic examination is when the doctor simultaneously inserts one finger in the rectum and one in the vagina.
It is helpful to take a mild laxative or enema before the pelvic exam.
Have a comprehensive family history taken by a physician knowledgeable in the risks associated with ovarian cancer. 5% to 10% of ovarian cancer has a familial link.

Every woman should undergo a regular rectal and vaginal pelvic examination. If an irregularity of the ovary is found, alternatives to evaluation include trans-vaginal sonography and/or tumor markers. The most common tumor marker is a blood test called the CA-125.

What is Ovarian Cancer?

Ovarian cancer is a disease in which malignant or cancerous cells are found in the ovaries. An ovary is one of two small, almond-shaped organs located on each side of the uterus that store eggs or germ cells and produce female hormones estrogen and progesterone.

Cancer Basics

Cancer develops when cells in a part of the body (in this case the ovary) begin to grow out of control. Although there are many kinds of cancer, they all start because of out-of-control growth of abnormal cells.

Normally, cells in your body divide, and form new cells to replace worn out or dying cells and to repair injuries. Because cancer cells continue to grow and divide, they are different from normal cells. Instead of dying, they outlive normal cells and continue to create new abnormal cells forming a tumor. Tumors can put pressure on other organs lying near the ovaries.

Cancer cells sometimes can travel to other parts of the body where they begin to grow and replace normal tissue. This process, called metastasis, occurs as the cancer cells move into the bloodstream or lymph vessels of our body. Cancer cells that spread from other organ sites (such as breast or colon) to the ovary are not considered ovarian cancer.

There are many types of tumors that can start in the ovaries. Some are benign, or noncancerous, and the patient can be cured by surgically removing one ovary or the part of the ovary containing the tumor. Some are malignant or cancerous. The treatment options and the outcome for the patient depend on the type of ovarian cancer and how far it has spread before it is diagnosed.

What is the general outlook for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer?

In women age 35-74, ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer-related deaths. An estimated one woman in 75 will develop ovarian cancer during her lifetime. The American Cancer Society estimates that there will be over 22,000 new cases of ovarian cancer diagnosed this year and that more than 15,000 women will die from ovarian cancer this year.

When one is diagnosed and treated in the earliest stages, the 5-year survival rate is over 90%. Due to Ovarian Cancer’s non-specific symptoms and lack of early detection tests, only 19% of all cases are found at this early stage. If caught in stage III or higher, the survival rate can be as low as 30.6%. Due to the nature of the disease, each woman diagnosed with ovarian cancer has a different profile and it is impossible to provide a general prognosis.


Source: National Ovarian Cancer Coalition